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Happiness Follows the doer of good
(THE TWIN VERSES)
Good begets good

1 (2) The Story of Mattakundali (Verse 2)

Mind is the forerunner of (all good) states. Mind is chief; mind-made are they. If one speaks or acts with pure mind, happiness will follow, just like one's shadow that never leaves.

Story
Mattakundali, the only son of a stingy millionaire, was suffering from jaundice and was on the verge of death because his father would not consult a physician lest some part of his money should have to be spent. The Buddha, perceiving with His Divine Eye the sad plight of the dying boy, appeared before him. Seeing the Buddha, he was pleased, and, dying with a pure heart, full of faith in the Buddha, was born in a heavenly state.

1. In this particular verse dhamma refers to good Kamma (action).
2. These two parallel verses were uttered by the Buddha on two different occasions to show the inevitable effects of evil and good Kamma respectively.

Man reaps what he has sown in the past or in the present. What he sows now he reaps in the present or in the future at the opportune moment. Man himself is mainly responsible for his own happiness and misery. He creates his own hell and heaven. He is the architect of his own fate. What he makes he can unmake.

Buddhism teaches self-responsibility and the inevitability of the law of cause and effect. What one reaps accords with what one has sown, but one is not bound to reap the effects of all that one has sown. If one were, emancipation would become an impossibility.

Manopubbangama dhamma, manosettha manomaya
Manasa ce pasannena, bhasati va karoti va Tato nam sukhamanveti, chaya’va anapayinī.

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