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Uncontrolled Hatred Leads To Harm
Overcoming Anger

In our human society, we often quarrel with one each other. When such conflicts occur, people often keep thinking about the wrongdoings done to them by others. Then their anger tends to grow. But in those who forgive and forget the wrongs done to them, anger quickly vanishes. They are then at peace. When you don't dot get angry, anger does not get you.

Akkocchi mam avadhi mam ,
ajini ma m ahasi me
Yeca tam upanayhantim,
veram tesam na sammati.

“He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,” in those who harbour such thoughts hatred is not appeased.

“He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,” in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred is appeased.

Story
The Venerable Tissa, proud of being a cousin of the Buddha, did not pay due respect to the senior monks. When they resented his improper conduct, he took offence and,, threatening them, went up to the Buddha and made a complaint. The Buddha, who understood the position, advised him to apologize, but the Venerable Tissa was obstinate. The Buddha then related a story to show that Tissa had done likewise in a previous birth. Later, the Venerable Tissa was compelled to seek pardon from the senior monks.

The Buddha's constant advice to His followers is not to retaliate but to practise patience at all times, at all places, even under provocation. The Buddha extols those who bear and forbear the wrongs of others though they have the power to retaliate. In the Dhammapada itself there are many instances to show how the Buddha practised patience even when He was severely criticised, abused, and attacked. Patience is not a sign of weakness or defeatism but the unfailing strength of great men and women.

These verses reveal the psychological aspect that is basic to emotional control. Emotion is an excitement of the body that stems from a thought. A thought creates a mental picture which, if held onto creates a corresponding emotion. It is only when such a mental picture is discarded and paid no attention to, that the emotion subsides. The Buddha’s constant advice to His followers was not to retaliate but to practice patience at all times and places, even under provocation.

The Buddha praises those who forebear the wrongs of others, even though they have the power to retaliate. In the Dhammapada itself there are many instances that show how the Buddha practiced patience, even when he was severely criticised, abused, and attacked. Patience is not a sign of weaknessor defeatism but the unfailing strength of great men and women. The secret ofpatience is to change the mental picture or how you interpret a situation. An example is given in the Shàntivàdi Jàtaka, where the saint Shàntivàdi was the Buddha Gotama in his former life. The saint kept repeating the thought, “Long live the king may he be free from harm,” while his limbs were severed until death, by this cruel king who wanted to test his patience.

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